Ring of power declared Treasure by British Museum.

The one ring of power manufactured by the Dark Lord Sauron (otherwise known as ‘Isildur’s Bane’) found by a Lincolnshire metal detectorist in 2015 has been declared Treasure, a spokesman for the British Museum has confirmed.

Miss Holly Sheet of Grimsby, who discovered the ring last year at an undisclosed location somewhere in the vicinity of Ancaster, said that she initially suspected the ring to be a fake. However, she was quickly convinced of its authenticity after watching Lord of the Rings, subsequently casting the ring into her fire-grate to reveal the glowing black speech lettering around the edge of the object, a feature that only reveals itself on application of extreme heat. Immediately realising the significance of her find, she contacted not only the Coroner and her local FLO, but also the department of fictional, occultist and magical artefacts at the British Museum, whereupon head curator Arthur Weasley was able to advise her on the correct procedure. We contacted Mr Weasley for comment, who gave us the following statement;

‘As the ring is of more than 10% precious metal and thousands of years old, in addition to fulfilling the hidden sub-clauses of the Treasure Act as pertaining to magical artefacts, I am proud to be able to declare it as Treasure. Naturally the discovery of the ring of power is incredibly significant, though this also comes with some dangers. Luckily I was able to step in before any harm was done. Had Miss Sheet put on the ring, she might well have drawn the attention of both the Dark Lord and his Nazgul. Such an act would have undoubtedly resulted in her swift abduction to Mordor by servants of the enemy. The ring will, therefore, be kept here in the vaults of the British Museum, to protect both itself from harm and others from it’s corrupting influence. Never to be used, except in our direst need. It may at times be shown to the public, and we are currently planning a six month exhibition next year which will feature the best of the magical or fictional artefacts within our collections. This may include such objects as the meteoric iron sword of Attila the Hun, Excalibur, the Holy Grail, a magic carpet, and Daenerys Targaryen’s Valyrian steel chastity belt.’

The ring, valued by the Treasure Valuation Committee at £25,000, has caused a certain amount of controversy. Many members of the detecting community have spoken out against the apparently low valuation of the piece, claiming that all the British Museum wants to do is use the ring to destroy the British government and claim ultimate power for itself, while others theorise that the current Director of the British Museum, Hartwig Fischer, has already fallen under its corrupting influence and now answers only to the bidding of Sauron. The Tolkien foundation have already released a lengthy letter from their solicitors asking that as their ancestral intellectual property (and thus, the original owners) the ring should be returned to them, while a certain Mr S Saruman of 3, the Crescent, Isengard, has also written in to stake his claim to the piece, acting under the auspices of ‘the great eye’. Strange events have also followed the discovery of the ring- it was recently revealed in a leaked memo that a number of northern museums had attempted to fundraise together in order to buy the ring and ‘throw off the shackles of the southern invaders, seizing ultimate power’ though this was quickly hushed up by a number of representatives who claimed the memo in fact consisted part of an internal curatorial staff dungeons and dragons game, having no connection to the discovery of the ring whatsoever. A recent attempted break-in at the British Museum involving two men, a wizard, an elf, a dwarf, and four hobbits, is not thought to be connected with the declaration of the ring as treasure.

Feelings are clearly running high on all fronts in reaction to the discovery of this object, but we here at Daily Detectorist feel happy that an artefact of such arcane potential is being safely held at the British Museum. The final hearing on the matter involving all those parties currently laying claim to the object will be held in the British Museum’s large underground basement on the 20th of October, though a spokesman clarified that they are currently in negotiations with the eye of Sauron in lieu of finding a more convenient location to hold the hearing, pending the unavailability of adequate toilet facilities.